12 Mistakes to Avoid Making With Your IRA

Mistakes to Avoid with IRA

Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs) are critical in securing financial independence in retirement. Because of this, Brian and Bo took the opportunity to discuss what mistakes they see clients make — and how you can avoid them. This episode was inspired by an article published by Morningstar back in February called 20 IRA Mistakes to Avoid.

These mistakes are also applicable to other retirement plans as well! If you’re contributing to a 401(k) or 403(b), you’ll want to listen in and understand the 12 mistakes the Money Guys say you must avoid making.

Here’s a quick rundown of the errors Brian and Bo cover in this podcast:

Procrastinating on Making Contributions

The Morningstar article cites the fact that if you’re investing later rather than sooner, you could be losing out on growth thanks to compound interest.

Many people also think they can take their time if they’re getting an extension on their taxes. That doesn’t apply to traditional and Roth IRAs — those contributions need to be in by April 15th.

Not Understanding Tax Bracket Implications

Do you understand the retirement account options you have and the impact each can have on your taxable income? Brian and Bo explain when you should invest in a Roth IRA over a traditional IRA, and which retirement vehicles you should prioritize.

Not Understanding Roth Conversions

If you’re looking to retire early, you’ll be able to plan your tax strategy in advance. Once you retire, you don’t have any earned income, and converting to a Roth IRA might prove to be a good decision as there are no required minimum distributions.

Being Retirement Rich and Liquidity Poor

Having a 7-figure portfolio and nothing in reserves won’t do you any good in the present should something go wrong. Plus, if you retire early and can’t start withdrawing until you’re 59 ½ years old, you’ll need money to tide you over.

Ignoring Spousal Contributions

If you or your spouse work while the other doesn’t, you can still take advantage of spousal contributions. The non-working spouse can use the other spouse’s earned income to make contributions for themselves.

Buying an Annuity

Purchasing an annuity within a retirement plan is usually a bad idea as you’re doubling up on tax shelters. Make sure buying an annuity actually makes sense for your situation.

Treating Your IRA as a Piggy Bank

Say you do leave your job – that technically means you have a distributable event. That doesn’t mean you should make the most of it and buy a new pool or TV. Ignore the temptation to withdraw funds and roll your money over.

Not Updating Beneficiary Designations

Have you divorced or remarried? Then you should update your beneficiary designations – you wouldn’t want your ex-spouse inheriting your money, would you?

Want to grab more tips and understand the mistakes you need to avoid with your IRA? Be sure to tune in to this episode of The Money Guy Show for advice on how to better manage your IRA!

5 Investment Mistakes Couples Make

Investment Mistakes Couples Make

Have you talked with your spouse about your investment strategy, or what the purpose is for your investments? Investing can be tricky enough alone, but it’s extremely important to include your other half in investment decisions so that you’re on the same page about how your money is being put to work.

If you haven’t yet discussed investing with your partner, you should read on to be aware of the common investment mistakes couples make so that you can avoid them.

Mistake #1: Only One Spouse Has Contact with a Financial Advisor

It doesn’t matter if one of you is more comfortable with the idea of investing. Both of you should be attending meetings and calls with your financial advisor because you’re in this together. You both have an equal stake in how your portfolio performs.

In the event that something happens to the spouse handling investments, the other will be lost when it comes to picking things back up. Avoid this burden by working as a team.

Mistake #2: Not Being Clear on Common Goals

You should be investing with a goal in mind — whether you’re aiming for early retirement, funding your children’s college expenses, or saving up for a down payment on a house in five years.

Are you and your spouse in agreement on your investment goals? If you haven’t talked about investing beyond “it’s the right thing to do”, then you should. Otherwise, you might face an issue down the road where one spouse wants to withdraw money early from a retirement account for an expense that was never discussed.

Mistake #3: Investing Without Being Informed

Just because your investments might be managed by someone else doesn’t mean you should blindly follow their advice. You should absolutely know what you’re investing in and be a part of the decision process.

Never be afraid to ask your advisor questions. They should be able to answer them honestly, and they should want you to understand the reasons behind their investment decisions.

Mistake #4: Not Taking Advantage of Employer Matching Contributions

Do you and your spouse have a 401(k) retirement plan offered through your employer? Are you contributing enough to receive the amount your employer will match?

If you don’t know the answers or aren’t sure, you need to look into this. You could be leaving free money on the table. You should be able to ask your HR department about the details of your retirement plan.

If you’re not sure what matching contributions are, here’s an example of how they work: If your gross annual salary is $75,000 and your employer matches contributions up to 6%, then that means you have to contribute 6% ($4,500) of your salary for them to match that contribution.

If you only contribute $3,000, then you’re missing out on $1,500 from your employer. Likewise, anything above $4,500 won’t be matched, but you’ll still be funding your retirement.

Mistake #5: Being Unaware of How Your Advisor is Paid

One of the biggest mistakes you can make is hiring an advisor without knowing how they get paid. Are they fee only, do they get paid a commission, or a hybrid of both?

This is important because you want to ensure there’s no conflict of interest when your advisor recommends certain products to you. If they make a commission off of sales, then they might not be looking out for your best interests.

You should also check to see if your advisor is a fiduciary. If they are, then there’s no doubt they’ll be acting in your best interests, as financial fiduciaries are required to do so upon taking an oath.

To avoid these common investment mistakes couples make, remember that investing requires teamwork. Neither of you should be working alone when it comes to financial matters.

If you don’t have confidence in your knowledge of investing, you can always learn from the many resources available to you online. Building wealth through investing will ensure a successful financial future, and it’s not a matter to take a backseat on.